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While hiking in Antalya, Turkey, you’ll experience spectacular landscape views of beaches, mountains, canyons, lakes, and national parks. The Antalya province is home to the Tarsus Mountain range and the Mediterranean coast, making it a hiking lover’s dream.

No matter which hikes you choose, you’ll have dramatic mountain views and the sparkling blue water of the Mediterranean at every turn. We created the guide to hiking in Antalya to share the best hiking locations on the Mediterranean coast in Turkey.

The best time to hike in Antalya is March to May or September to November when the weather is mild. You will find the summer months in the Mediterranean region are hot and humid with the winter months bringing the rainy season. For optimal conditions, Spring and Fall are the best times to enjoy hiking in Turkey.

Next, we’ll look at some of the most popular hikes in Antalya.

Lycian Way

Breathtaking views on the Lycian Way while hiking in Antalya

Breathtaking views on the Lycian Way

The Lycian Way is one of Turkey’s most popular long-distance hikes through the mountains in Turkey just inland of the Mediterranean coast. It’s a 540-kilometer cultural trail from Antalya to Fethiye and can take around 30 days to complete in its entirety.

Typically, hikers will start in Fethiye, but you can start the hike from whichever place you want to. The route connects Lycian ruins, coastal beach towns, nomadic footpaths, and ancient Roman roads. From Antalya, the trail starts in the mountains at Geyikbayiri.

In addition, the trail has 17 segments that you can hike individually. You’ll find some of the best partial hiking routes of the Lycian Way around the beach towns of Patara, Kalkan, or Kas. Hiking the Lycian Way promises breathtaking views and great adventures along the way.

Termessos

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One of the best hikes in Antalya is up to the ancient city of Termessos at the top of Mount Solymos. Access the trail at the Gulluk Dagi National Park, about 30km from the Antalya city center. Drive up to the trailhead to park, then you can take off up the path to the top.

The trail is steep and rocky and takes about 45 minutes to an hour to get to the 1,000-meter mountain top view. You’ll have views of the Taurus Mountain range and get to explore the archeological site with an impressive great theater that boasts views of the sea and mountains. There are trails all through the ancient site and along the mountain. Plan on 4 to 5 hours to hike and explore the site. Be sure to take water and snacks with you.

Tazi Canyon

Tazi Canyon, also called Eagle Canyon, is a hike in Antalya in Koprulugu Canyon National Park that you do not want to miss. The hiking path is difficult in some places, being rocky with some larger boulders to climb over.

Along the 11km hike, you’ll see plenty of wildlife and many different species of plants. You’ll have breathtaking views from the top of the canyon with the cliffs dropping a steep 400 meters. Be sure to bring water, snacks, and your camera.

Goynuk Canyon

Hiking in Antalya isn’t complete until you’ve visited Goynuk Canyon where you can enjoy hiking or canyoning. The trail is 3km long with the highest point being 1km into the hike. It’s a beautiful hike surrounded by pine trees and the sound of the river. There is a lake at the end of the trail where you can take a break and enjoy the ice-cold water, especially on a hot day. This is an easy hike for beginners with stunning views of the mountains, canyon, and river.

St. Paul Trail

The St. Paul Trail is thought to be one of the oldest paths for hiking in Antalya, stretching over 500 km taking approximately 27 days to hike. The trail is made up of old Roman roads and forest trails.

The hike starts in the Perge and follows the footsteps of the Apostle Paul to the ancient city of Antioch. The trail is marked along the way with options for village houses or pensions to stay in. Subsequently, on longer stretches of the hike, you will have to camp.

Kas to Limanagzi Bay

This is about a 2-hour hike of the Lycian Way that takes you to Limangazi Beach which can only be reached by hiking or a water taxi from Kas Harbor. As you’re hiking on the trail, you’ll come up to a split in the trail leading to the beach.

If you take the cliff route, it’s steep and would not be safe if you’re carrying a heavy pack or if you had rough weather. The views from the cliff path are fantastic and well worth the winding path along the cliffs. Alternately, if you take the inland path, you’ll pass by ancient ruins along the way to the beach.

Most importantly, bring your swimsuit to swim in the sea once you arrive. There are local cafes on-site where you can enjoy breakfast or lunch before heading back. If you do not want to hike back, you can catch a ride back to Kas on a shuttle boat.

Mt. Tahtahli (Olympos)

Snow-capped Mt. Tahtahli in the distance. One of the best hikes in Antalya

Snow-capped Mt. Tahtahli in the distance

Mt. Tahtalhli is the steepest trek in Antalya along the Mediterranean coast. Start the hike from Kemer and head straight up the mountain to the 2,365-meter summit. The hike is challenging and takes a little over 7 hours to complete, so start early and bring plenty of food and water.

From the top of Mt. Tahtali, enjoy awe-inspiring views of the Antalya mountains and the Mediterranean Sea. Afterward, you can hike down the mountain or take a 10-minute ride down to the mountain base in a cable car.

Saklikent Gorge

Other-worldy Saklikent Gorge

Saklikent Gorge near Antalya

Saklikent Gorge is an hour from Fehtiye in Saklikent National Park in the mountains of Turkey. The gorge is in the Tarsus Mountains and is considered the 3rd largest canyon in Europe, stretching 18km and 300m deep.

The path is narrow and follows along the river. At times there will be times that you will walk through the water on your hike, so wear footwear that can be submerged in water along the way. If you want to take the high road, there are boardwalk routes available to stay above the water.

The best views are past the first river crossing. Sometimes that path is wide, sometimes so narrow you must climb over boulders to pass through. While hiking you’ll see the natural beauty of the canyon as it climbs up to 720 meters tall, icy cold mountain water, waterfalls and pine trees that cover the mountain range above. This is a great hike during the summer when it is hot outside. You can enjoy the cooler air in the canyon and take a dip in the water.

Eternal Flame of Chimaira

In the village of Cirali, you’ll find a well-known trail for hiking in Antalya, the eternal flames of Mt. Chimaira. There are several places where flames burn straight from the rocks up on the hill.

The hike starts at the ruins of Yanartas at the bottom of the mountain. You can drive back to the entrance or walk from the beach. You will pay a minimal entrance fee to hike up to the flames. The 2 km trek has a nice dirt path but is steep in places with places to stop and rest as needed.

You’ll have great views of Cirali beach and the Mediterranean Sea as you make your way up the trail. You’ll need about 2-3 hours to hike in to explore and then back down to the entrance.

Sapadere Canyon

Sapadere Canyon Waterfall

Sapadere Canyon Waterfall

The Sapadere Canyon hiking trail is in the mountains of Turkey with rewarding mountain views, waterfalls, and natural pools at the end of the trail. It’s an easy 30-minute hike to reach the village of Sapadere, where you’ll see plenty of wildlife, local plants, mountains and the river.

When you reach the end of the trail, you can jump into the ice-cold water of the waterfall pools to cool off. There are several cafes where you can enjoy tea or have a simple lunch.

Final Thoughts on Hiking in Antalya

Ultimately, you cannot go wrong hiking in Antalya with the picturesque views of the mountains and the Mediterranean Sea. Enjoy hiking through canyons, Antalya mountains and the coastal trails to experience the culture, history and beauty of Turkey.

Hiking in Antalya: Best Hikes in Turkey

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Hiking in Antalya

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Meditation has been tagged with some interesting stereotypes over the years. Many people think you have to be in a dark, quiet room with your legs crossed and eyes closed, doing some kind of “ohm” chant to meditate properly.

That’s just not true.

Meditation can take many forms – including hiking and backpacking. If those are hobbies you already love, it’s time to consider how they can help you feel re-centered and reduce your stress levels while you’re on the trail.

Many spiritual leaders have touted the effectiveness of walking meditation, and you can apply those principles to your hikes by being more mindful on each journey. If you’ve never meditated before, it can take some practice to connect physical activity to a clearing of the mind. But, hiking is already a great way to improve your mental and physical health. Adding meditation to your walks can help you feel more connected with the earth, and yourself.

Let’s cover some of the benefits of hiking as meditation and how you can set clear intentions for your treks.

The Benefits of a Mindful Hike

There’s no question that simply spending time in nature is good for your health. It reduces stress and anxiety and can offer a boost of energy. Taking things one step further (no pun intended) through walking meditation can offer even greater benefits to your physical and mental well-being. Some of the “perks” you can expect from being more mindful on your hikes include:

  • Increased blood flow
  • Improved digestion
  • Reduced anxiety
  • Improved circulation
  • Better sleep quality
  • Enhanced balance

Walking meditation also helps with symptoms of depression and anxiety and can boost your creativity levels if it feels like you’ve been in a slump lately. Combining mindfulness with regular outdoor exercise, like hiking, is also a fantastic way to naturally boost testosterone levels (which can decrease with age). That will lead to a clearer mind and greater physical awareness while also promoting strength and vitality.

How to Meditate On the Trail

Ready to give hiking as meditation a try for yourself?

Again, you don’t have to worry about specific chants or keeping your eyes closed while you walk – that would probably do more harm than good with trees around! Walking meditation is easier than you might think. Try the following steps to break down the process until it becomes more familiar.

  1. Find a spot on the trail or a clearing in a wooded area that will allow you to freely walk back and forth about 10 to 15 feet.
  2. Stroll throughout that area slowly as you breathe deeply and take in your surroundings.
  3. Take slow, intentional, mindful steps, and focus on sensations that you usually don’t notice. That could include how your feet and legs feel while moving, or the rhythm of your breathing. It could even include the gentle “thud” your feet make with each step. The more you focus on yourself and the world around you at that moment, the more mindful and present you’ll be.

You may have other thoughts come to mind. That’s out of your control, and you don’t have to work to “block” those thoughts out. There’s nothing you can do to prevent both positive and negative ideas from entering your mind, but think of them like clouds passing by. Don’t hold onto them, and do your best to refocus on the present.

You can continue to be mindful throughout your hike, paying attention to how your body feels with each step forward while also observing the sights, sounds, and smells of your surroundings. It’s a wonderful way to manage your anxiety while hiking and to feel more relaxed by the time you’re finished.

Staying Safe

While meditating on a hike is a wonderful way to feel more connected with the earth and your natural surroundings, it’s important not to bite off more than you can chew. If you’re new to hiking, familiarize yourself with certain trails and build up your strength and stamina before you try to meditate on your journey. You’ll still enjoy wonderful mental and physical health benefits, simply by exercising in nature.

Additionally, if you deal with chronic pain or you’re trying to recover from an injury, use a pain scale to determine if you’re ready to be active again. Pushing through the pain or trying to force yourself to get back on the trail can end up hindering your performance. You’ll also be so focused on that pain that it will be nearly impossible to be mindful and present.

Whether you’re just getting into hiking or you’ve been hitting the trail for years, there are more benefits than we could ever think to list here. Using hiking as meditation, however, adds to that list and can help you feel more in tune with the world around you while reducing your stress levels. If you’re ready for that step, try to introduce walking meditation into your next hike.

As a person who loves the great outdoors and going on hikes, there is nothing I love more than the fresh air and a great view, something you can get plenty of in Alberta. 

During my last 8 months in Canada, I’ve spent a lot of time in Alberta and have been trying to find the best day hikes that don’t have heaps of tourists. Who doesn’t prefer quiet, peaceful walks through nature? During the winter, that’s an easy task, as many of the more difficult trails are closed due to the weather. Plus, who wants to go hiking in -40c?! Not me.  

However, during summer, also known as the peak season, it was a challenge to find off-the-beaten trails in Alberta that were short enough to complete in 1 day and didn’t have hundreds of tourists.

Below, I have listed some of my favourite day hikes off the beaten path in Alberta. Some are easy for beginners, and some are more tricky, but all feature a great view without too much effort.

East End of Rundle

Stunning views over Whitemans pond and Ha Ling peak from the East End of Rundle Trail

Stunning views over Whitemans pond and Ha Ling peak from the East End of Rundle Trail

At 4.8 km long and taking between 6-7 hours to complete, the East End of Rundle hike is one of the slightly longer day hikes in Alberta and one that’s a real leg burner. Starting on the edge of a forest on the side of Rundle mountain, this trail is steep pretty much the entire way. It can be difficult to tell what direction the trail leads as there are not too many signs anymore – keep an eye out for the orange ribbons! They’ll help guide you. 

I highly recommend bringing some gloves, as it can become a difficult scramble around the halfway point. You may need to use your hands to keep yourself stable. After around 2 hours you’ll be rewarded with stunning views over the Whitemans pond and its neighbouring mountain Ha Ling peak – this makes a fantastic spot to watch the sunrise (or sunset). The summit can get extremely windy in this part of Alberta, so be careful!

Valley of the Five Lakes

The Valley of the Five Lake hike is one of the shortest day hikes on our list in Alberta. At an average of 1.5 hours to complete, it’s a simple trail that doesn’t take much effort, which means anyone can enjoy it. With a very low elevation, this is the perfect short walk without breaking a sweat. There are two steep sections, but for no more than a few steps. Some parts of the trail get very narrow, you may have to walk single file if travelling in a group. Along the way, you’ll have multiple opportunities to stop and enjoy the lake views at the many openings by the water’s edge.

Ha Ling Peak

Take in the view from HaLing peak on one of Alberta's best day hikes

Take in the view from HaLing peak

If you did the East End of Rundle trail, you’d be able to see Ha Ling Peak in your view, but what about climbing Ha Ling for yourself? One of the more moderate day hikes in Alberta, this trail has chains to use as handrails to help you when you’re climbing up due to the uneven terrain. In typical Alberta fashion, it can be extremely windy when you get to the peak, so be mindful that it can throw you off balance if you’re not careful. 

Along the route, you’ll have the chance to stop for photos on a few flat viewpoints before you reach the summit of Ha Ling Peak. From the top, you’ll see the town of Canmore as well as much of the Bow Valley down below. It’ll take you an average of 4-5 hours to reach the summit and make it back down the trail.

The Big Beehive

This hike puts a new spin on a world-famous lake in Banff National Park. The Big Beehive trail is only really accessible during the summer months and can get quite busy during this peak season. As it is a loop trail, you can continue through the entire trail without backtracking, meaning you get fresh views for the entire route. 

Most average hikers with a good level of fitness can finish this trail in under 6 hours, making it suited for a day hike. This trail has a few different highlights including Lake Louise, Mirror Lake, and the tea house before heading to the summit, this just gives you plenty of photo opportunities to enjoy! 

Grassi Lakes

The Grassi Lakes hike offers options for both beginner and advanced hikers

The Grassi Lakes hike offers options for both beginner and advanced hikers

Also in Canmore, The Grassi Lakes hike is probably one of the most easy-to-do short day hikes in Alberta. Although this hike is rated as number 1 in the region on Alltrails, every time I have been I’ve seen no more than 3 others on the trail. This is a walking route the whole family can enjoy! It’s a trail with two options, the easy way and the more difficult way, and even as a loop they only take between 1 and 2 hours to complete. 

The easy way takes you up a gradual hill through the forest until you reach the 2 small lakes and beautiful viewpoint. Whereas the more difficult way keeps you on lower elevation until the last portion of the trail. This is where you come across a large waterfall and steep staircase built into the cliff. This can become slippery due to water spray, so hold onto the rails, but make sure you enjoy the view! 

Lake Louise Lakefront Trail

The Lake Louise Lakefront Trail is another one of Alberta’s short day hikes at only 1.5 hours to complete. This one takes you along the edge of the turquoise Lake Louise – a nice change compared to the Big Beehive trail that takes you up and over the lake for a birds-eye view. 

With barely any elevation, you won’t end up with muscle aches, which I’m sure you’ll be thankful for. In the summer you can walk around the lake, and during the winter you can even walk on it when it freezes over. This is a year-round accessible trail for people with all fitness levels. 

Prairie Mountain

Summiting Prairie Mountain

Summiting Prairie Mountain

Average hikers finish the Prairie Mountain hike in 2 hours (1 hour up and just over an hour down) but many can finish quicker in clear weather. The trailhead starts southwest of Bragg Creek near the Elbow River. Although steep, (the trail reaches an elevation of 666 m), it’s a pretty easy walk for most of the way up and accessible for most fitness levels. 

There are endless mountain views from the viewpoint across the valley, so Prairie Mountain is one of the best day hikes in Alberta to avoid the crowds. Although this is a hike that can be accessed all year round, the driving access road usually closes for the winter due to weather conditions. If you do decide to hike Prairie Mountain during the colder months, crampons and spikes are recommended, as the scramble can get a bit slippery. When you make it to the top, you’ll have a nice surprise, seeing the flag waving at the summit!

Boom Lake Trail

The Boom Lake Trail is another trail with minimal incline and is more of a stroll than a hike. It takes roughly 3.5 hours to complete, so it’s perfect if you’re looking for a day hike in Alberta. As an out and back trail, you’ll need to backtrack once you get to the lake to reach the Boom Lake Trail finish line. As you walk along the track, you will see a few small streams as you head towards Boom Lake. In summer, they are crystal clear and flowing and add to the beauty of the region.

In the winter months, these streams can become dangerously icy along the trail, so use caution. When hiking during summer and spring, you can expect to see a stunning bright blue lake that Canada is known for. Take it in and enjoy your reward for walking the trail!

Summary

There you have it, 8 fun day hikes in Alberta that offer great views of the province! Of course, if I listed every single one we would be here for days, so I have handpicked some of the most enjoyable – but also less busy – trails for hikers to enjoy without being stuck in a crowd. Because let’s face it, nobody likes having to line up for a photo op at a viewpoint!

The Best Day Hikes in Alberta Canada to Avoid the Crowds

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If you’re new to backpacking, it can be hard to know what gear you need for days on the trail. Backpacking and outdoor sports are more popular than ever, and you’ve probably seen a huge number of companies advertising their hiking backpacks and touting all the spectacular features they have. While these backpacks are great, and they are necessary for some things like backpacking, you won’t always need to choose best, shiniest product on the market.

In some cases, yes, you can use a regular backpack for backpacking. If you aren’t doing any serious trips, won’t be in poor weather conditions, or just need to carry some extra things on an impromptu trek in the woods, a regular backpack is more than sufficient. However, if you are going for multiple days, carrying a lot of weight, or in bad weather, you may be thinking about choosing from the different types of backpacking packs.

Like always, that answer will vary based on your plans, distance traveled, and needs on your trip. A good rule of thumb is that under 5 miles, your regular backpacks will work relatively well. Beyond that, you’ll begin to notice discomfort, and may start wishing for the features of a proper backpacking packs. 

How Do I Know If I Need a Backpacking Pack?

How Do I Know If I Need a Hiking Backpack?

You may want to consider upgrading from a regular backpack if you’re taking longer backpacking trips and need more capacity, or you’re noticing discomfort due to the style of backpack you have chosen. Most types of backpacking packs have extra padding, straps, and a more ergonomic construction compared to a backpack you may just use for school books.

This means you can carry your gear for longer periods, and higher amounts of weight will be more comfortable to carry. If you’re backpacking for more than a day, or your pack is getting to be on the heavier side, you should probably start looking into a more suitable option than a regular backpack.

What features should I look for in a backpacking pack?

The most imperative thing is to simply plan for the trip you are taking. If you’re on a day hike, you need a much different pack than you would for backpacking. If you’re carrying heavy weight or traveling great distances in a day, a school backpack will likely become uncomfortable or challenging to use effectively. If your regular backpack is lacking in technical features or isn’t cutting it on your longer hikes, look out for backpacks with features like those listed below:

  • Top loading design
  • Extra pockets
  • Additional padding
  • Waist and/or sternum straps
  • Adjustability 
  • Water-bladder pocket/Hydration reservoir
  • Sleeping bag stash
  • Attachment points and/or tool loops
  • Raincover
  • Ventilation features
  • Greater variability of sizes
  • More comfortable weight distribution
  • Removable daypack

I also recommend a waterproof option if you expect a trip in less than perfect conditions. One positive is that many backpacks made for general use have hiking features, and there’s a good chance you may have a North Face or Osprey bag you use already around the house. If that’s the case, you’ve already got a great tool that will hold up to a lot of your needs.

What different types of backpacking packs are there?

Generally, backpacking packs are defined by their size and style. The 3 different types of backpacking packs are the external frame, internal frame, and frameless backpacks. As far as size, they are measured in liters and you will often see different sizes listed as Daypacks, weekend backpacks, multi-day backpacks, and extended trip/expedition packs.

The different styles of the frame can be confusing, especially if you don’t have experience backpacking or rucking. Frameless backpacks are very light with flexible construction and are designed to carry light loads. A frameless backpacking pack lacks any rods or frame sheets to distribute weight.

Yes! You can use a regular backpack for hiking

They generally don’t hold more than 40 liters and are not meant to carry a heavy load. Internal frame backpacks are the most popular type of backpacking pack available, and feature a more rigid construction that distributes weight more, and keeps the backpacking pack from collapsing. They’re often made with a frame-sheet on the inside. External frame packs feature a frame often made of aluminum on the outside, with a harness attached to it.

They’re used for carrying very heavy loads. They are not as commonly available in modern times, but some companies still offer this style due to their highly adjustable style, and customizable nature.

Sizes are often defined as follows: daypacks (1 day or less) are what you use for very short adventures, and often hold under 30 liters. A weekend pack (1-3 days) measures about 30-50 liters. Multi-day backpacks (3-5 days) hold 50-80 liters, and extended trip backpacks (5+ days) hold 70+ liters.

Depending on your needs and what outdoor sport you perform, you obviously may need a larger or smaller pack. For instance, if you’re a climber and need to carry ropes, shoes, harnesses, protection, and so on, a bigger backpacking pack may be necessary.

Many people also prefer small packs in which they carry very little gear so they can travel faster. You can choose a smaller pack if you’re disciplined about what you pack and comfortable with a lack of supplies. The reverse also works, if you want a more comfortable experience and you’re alright with the extra weight. 

Each option has its advantages, but the average hiker will be perfectly fine with a mid-sized, internal frame backpack. This is what makes up the vast majority of the market, and most people won’t need anything beyond that. 

What brands to look at for a backpacking pack?

I can’t give you a fully comprehensive list of brands that will suit every need you may have backpacking, but generally, you’ll see excellent products in outdoor stores, or from the companies, you commonly associate with outdoor products. Ideally, I would recommend going to a local outdoor store and seeing what packs fit you comfortably and suit your needs, but researching products online is a great option. You should choose your backpack based on your specific needs.

With all the different types of backpacking packs, there are a massive number of brands, and I’m just going to list a few. If you choose a backpacking pack from a brand that isn’t listed, that doesn’t mean it’s a bad option. I still recommend looking for reviews online or checking forums for information. Another great method is to see what type of pack people in your area or sport use. A few brands to check out are below:

  • Osprey
  • REI
  • North Face
  • Patagonia
  • Hyperlite Mountain Gear
  • Granite Gear
  • Mountainsmith
  • Deuter
  • Mystery Ranch
  • ULA Equipment

One thing you may have noticed is that many of these companies make “regular” backpacks that you may see daily. For me, seeing North Face, Osprey, Patagonia, and REI packs on a school campus was never uncommon. I even use a North Face backpack when going on short hikes or to carry gear when bouldering. My North Face pack is just a mid-sized backpack with hiking features, and it works great if I’m not on a longer trip.

A “regular” backpack from an outdoor gear company generally has several hiking features like waist straps, extra pockets, and so on. If you’re just going on some moderate hikes where you need to carry a bit of gear, you probably already have a backpack in this style that you can use. 

Should I choose an internal or external frame pack?

Generally, most hiking backpacks these days are internal frames, but there are still some models featuring an external frame. If you aren’t aware, external frame packs are a style of a backpack that features a frame on the outside of the pack, generally constructed out of aluminum or composite material.

There’s also often space on the frame above or below the pack itself so you can attach larger gear like backpacking tents or sleeping bags. They were once the standard for backpacking, and they’re generally meant to be used for heavier loads. You can sometimes find external frame packs for a cheaper price compared to internal frame packs, but since internal frames are so common now that isn’t as true as it once was. 

If you’re in the market for a hiking backpack and aren’t sure if you should get an external frame model, just consider what activities you will be performing, and how much weight you will carry. This type of backpacking pack is spectacular for long trips and heavy loads, but for an average hike, they are completely unnecessary.

There’s a good chance you’ve never even seen an external frame backpacking pack in a store. If you happen to try one and find it comfortable, there’s no problem using it, just keep in mind they’re generally for more serious adventures. Another thing to note, there are frameless backpacks as well, but they are generally designed for very light loads. 

Are there any alternatives to backpacking packs?

If you’re on a short trip but you don’t want to carry a traditional backpack, you may be wondering what alternatives are available. While backpacks are the best option for most scenarios, there are some alternatives. Shoulder/sling bags are a smaller option that can be easier to carry than a two-strap backpack, and they’re excellent if you don’t have much you want to carry.

Lumbar packs are another alternative. They sit in the lumbar area of the back and are smaller capacity options that may be more comfortable for you. Fanny packs are another good choice if you don’t have many pockets but you want to carry some essentials on the trail. Each of these options comes in several sizes from reputable outdoor companies, but it’s important to note that most of these products hold under 20 liters. 

Conclusion

It can be difficult to know if your backpack will work on the trail, or if you need to invest in a new type of backpacking pack to hike in. With outdoor sports being so popular, and more options available than ever, it may be tempting to choose a fancy hiking backpack for your next trek in the woods. Personally, I think that you’ll know when your pack isn’t working. For most of my days outside, a simple North Face backpack with fairly basic features is more than sufficient.

I can fit most of my hiking gear on or in it, and it’s comfortable for day hikes. Once you get into the range of multi-day trips, backpacking adventures, or have a lot of gear, it becomes apparent that a hiking backpack is necessary. Without the extra features, you’ll likely become uncomfortable, or leave out a necessary piece of gear. I always recommend further research, and it’s imperative to choose a backpack that is comfortable for you. If your bag isn’t comfortable, then there’s little chance you’re going to enjoy a great day in nature.

We all know Miami for its awesome beaches and fantastic cuisine. However, Miami has different kinds of hiking spots that will allow you to experience Miami off the beaten path. While you won’t be scrambling up rocks or climbing hills, you’ll be able to take in the unique natural beauty of Miami on these wondering hiking paths. In today’s topic, we will be talking about 7 of the best places to go hiking in Miami. So, what are we waiting for? Let’s dive straight into it!

Myres Bayside Park Commodore Hiking Trail

Distance: 7.1km

Difficulty: Easy

Located in the heart of Miami, Kenneth M Myres Bayside Park is a perfect place for short trips and outings with families. The park draws a sharp contrast between the sky-high buildings and a beautiful bay. The park is family-friendly and it also has an outdoor gym and auditorium. It has been a picnic spot for a long time now and people also enjoy riding bikes through the greenery of nature.

Speaking of best trail, the Commodore Trail holds this prestigious title. The trail starts parallel to the highway and then gradually heads to the coconut grooves. The path is made of concrete surrounded by trees and plants on both sides. As you move through the trees, the city noises fade, and you will experience a peaceful atmosphere off the beaten path in Miami. The beautiful bay also falls on this trail and if you are lucky you can also get to see some iguanas on your way. The trail is pet-friendly for dogs, but make sure they stay on a leash all the time.

Big Cypress Florida Trail- Blue Orange Trail

Distance: 24km

Difficulty: Easy

Hiking near Miami on Big Cypress Florida Trail- Blue Orange Trail

Big Cypress Florida Trail- Blue Orange Trail

Want to spend more quality time with mother nature? How about a long hiking trip off the beaten path in Miami? Sounds great? Well, in that case, Big Cypress National Preserve should be on the top spot of your holiday list. Conserving over 729,000 acres of a vast swamp, this preserve is home to diverse flora and fauna including the endangered species, The Florida Panther. It is a lovely place to go on a scenic drive with your family. There are lots of picnic spots, swamp tours, and tons of outdoor activities along with 8 different campgrounds.

You can find many hiking and driving trails throughout the preserve with each having its own set of unique experiences. The trail that we love the most is the Blue Orange Trail Loop as it is lightly trafficked and perfect for all sorts of skill levels. The trail is covered with wildflowers and contains both tropical and temperate climate trees. You might also find some alligators in the swamp so it is recommended to take a guide with you. 

Tropical Park Tropical Park Loop

Distance: 6km

Difficulty: Easy

It’s time for some lake time! Situated on a former race track, Tropical Park is a place that attracts tourists throughout the year with its scenic view. The park features three beautiful lakes and a green river bank which is home to many birds and other wildlife species. You will find many picnic tables with barbeque grills and many outdoor recreations including a sports center and boxing center. Dogs aren’t allowed on the trails but there is a different dog park area.

Topical Park Loop is a beautiful place to go hiking in Miami with a beautiful view of the river and the surrounding greenery. The trail has a hill for people to run up and down and have some fun. Beside the lake, you can find raccoons, ducks, iguanas, and many other varieties of animals. The landscape is breathtaking and the view of the blue lake under the blue sky is just beyond words. People also love the food here so don’t miss to check out the food trucks.

Oleta River State Park Trail

Distance: 4.8km

Difficulty: Moderate

Oleta River State Park Trail

Oleta River State Park Trail

Oleta River State Park is the largest urban park in Florida. It is situated on an oasis just around 30 minutes drive from downtown Miami. There are off-road bicycling trails, hiking trails, paddle boat trails throughout the park. If you are an adventure lover, this place is made for you! Old rustic cabins with air conditioners can also be found inside the state park. Activities like fishing and swimming are also allowed by the river. Though you won’t be far from Miami, you’ll truly feel off the beaten path.

Oleta River State Park Trail passes through mangrove forests and is slightly more challenging than the other trails. The trail is great for traveling away from the hustle and bustle of the city. The best part is that the trails are interconnected, so you can start from one and end on a completely different trail.  The mangrove trees also do a good job of blocking off the direct sunlight, so you don’t have to carry sunscreen with you. Your pet friend is allowed to company you on this trip, but he must be on a leash on the trails.

Everglades National Park Anhinga Trail

Distance: 1.3km

Difficulty: Easy

Just outside Miami - go hiking on the Anhinga Trail in the Florida Everglades

Just outside Miami – go hiking on the Anhinga Trail in the Florida Everglades

One of the central attractions near Miami is the Everglades National Park. This national park is the third-largest national park and largest subtropical wilderness in the US. As a UNESCO World Heritage site, there are many different kinds of endangered species and wildlife in the vicinity. The landscape of this park is wonderful and you can go on boating trips to the rivers and lakes. If you are planning to stay overnight amid nature, you will also find several campgrounds in the park.

For such a large park, like Everglades, Anhinga Trail is relatively short, yet people love this trail more than any other. The trail features beautiful wildflowers and during the winter season, you can witness numerous wildlife species. You can also go birdwatching in this family-friendly tour of a lifetime. The winter season is the best time for visiting the park as the water level remains low and birds migrate to take shelter during the winters. A delight for the bird lovers!

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park Lighthouse Loop

Distance: 4.8km

Difficulty: Easy

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park Lighthouse Loop

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park Lighthouse Loop

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park is a beach park and is often considered one of the top 10 beaches nationwide. This place is historically diverse, as Cape Florida has been a symbol of revolution in the pages of history. Nowadays, the park is used as a relaxing spot for hikers or bikers who want to get off the beaten path in Miami. You can go on guided tours and explore the history of the park, or you can enjoy the lovely natural landscape. You will also find many cottages and a lighthouse in the park. 

The Cape Florida lighthouse was built around 1825 and because of its rich historical value, visitors love visiting the Lighthouse Loop throughout the year. The trail is family-friendly presenting beautiful scenarios of rivers, trees, and wildflowers. You can also take a tour of the lighthouse and also take a tour of the park by boat or kayak. Make sure you stay till the evening as the view of the sunset over the bay is stunning.

Biscayne National Park Black Creek Canal Trail

Distance: 2.7km

Difficulty: Easy

Hiking near downtown Miami on Biscayne National Park Black Creek Canal Trail

Biscayne National Park Black Creek Canal Trail

Last but not least is the Biscayne National Park. Located right in Miami, yet feeling like a world away, this park has a lot to offer starting from hiking, boating, fishing, canoeing, and lobstering as well. This place is an ideal spot for water activities and birdwatching. Biscayne National Park also has its fair share of historical importance. You can opt-out for scuba diving and explore the vibrant colors of the coral reef.

 Take a short trip along the beachside and enjoy the scenic beauty and pleasing sounds of the ocean with your family through the Black Creek Canal Trail. The trail features a short hiking trip down the mangrove lined-shore that leads to the Colonial Bird Protection area. The place has lots of resting spots and some picnic tables too. There are information panels throughout the trail which give you directions and interesting information regarding the vivid history of the park. 

Start your Hiking Adventure in Miami

Miami is one of the largest cities in Florida and also one of the most common tourist destinations. But if you’re looking to experience Miami off the beaten path, you can find beautiful nature and wildlife while hiking in Miami. Enjoy your trip!