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Europe’s best camping spots that are off the beaten path

If you’re looking for a truly unique camping experience, you’ll want to check out some of these hidden gems in Europe. From secluded mountain retreats to idyllic coastal spots, these locations offer everything you need for a relaxing and memorable trip. So, if you’re ready to explore some of Europe’s best kept camping secrets, read on!

Norway’s Lofoten Islands

Camping in Norway's Lofoten Islands

Camping in Norway’s Lofoten Islands

If you’re looking for breathtaking scenery and incredible hiking opportunities, the Lofoten Islands in Norway are the perfect place for you. This archipelago is known for its dramatic landscapes, with towering mountains, pristine lakes, and picturesque coastline. There are also plenty of opportunities to spot wildlife, including seals, eagles, and even whales.

Italy’s Cinque Terre

Discover Italy's Cinque Terre while camping in Europe

Discover Italy’s Cinque Terre while camping in Europe

The Cinque Terre is a stunning stretch of coastline in Italy that is made up of five picturesque villages. This is the perfect spot for a relaxing camping trip, as you can spend your days swimming in the crystal-clear waters, exploring the charming villages, and indulging in delicious Italian cuisine.

The Isle of Skye in Scotland

The stunning landscape of Isle of Skye - best discovered by camping

The stunning landscape of Isle of Skye – best discovered by camping

The Isle of Skye is one of Scotland’s most scenic and popular tourist destinations. With its rugged coastline, towering mountains, and lush green landscapes, it’s easy to see why. There are also plenty of opportunities for outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, and kayaking. And if you’re lucky, you might even spot some dolphins or whales offshore.

Slovenia’s Lake Bled

Gorgeous Lake Bled is the perfect place to go camping in Europe

Gorgeous Lake Bled is the perfect place to go camping in Europe

Lake Bled is a beautiful glacial lake in Slovenia that is surrounded by forests and mountains. It’s the perfect place to escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life and enjoy some peace and quiet. There are also plenty of activities to keep you busy, such as hiking, swimming, boating, and horseback riding.

Why you should go camping in Europe

If you love spending time outdoors and enjoying nature, then camping in Europe is definitely for you. The continent is home to some of the most beautiful camping spots in the world, and there are plenty of hidden gems to be discovered. Here are just a few reasons why you should go camping in Europe:

  1. There are so many different types of scenery to explore. Whether you want to camp in the mountains, by the sea, or in a forest, Europe has it all. And with so many different countries to choose from, you’re sure to find the perfect spot for your next camping adventure.
  2. You can find campsites that suit all budgets. Whether you’re looking for a luxury camping experience or something more basic, there are plenty of options available across Europe. There are also a number of free campsites if you’re on a tight budget.
  3. The weather is usually pretty good. Of course, the weather can never be guaranteed but in general, the climate in Europe is ideal for camping. In the summer months, you can enjoy long days and warm nights, perfect for spending time outside. And in the winter, there are plenty of opportunities for winter camping if that’s what you’re after.
  4. There’s a huge range of activities on offer. From hiking and cycling to swimming and fishing, there’s no shortage of things to do when camping in Europe. And with so much natural beauty to explore, you’ll never get bored.
  5. You can meet new people and make lifelong friends. One of the best things about camping is the sense of community that comes with it. You’ll meet like-minded people from all over the world and form friendships that will last a lifetime.

The best time to go camping in Europe

In Europe the climate can vary a lot from country to country so the best time to go camping here will depend a lot on your destination.

For example, in Spain, the best time to go camping is in the springtime. The weather is perfect for spending time outdoors, and the flowers are in bloom. Camping in the Pyrenees is a must-do for any nature lover.

In Italy, it is ideal to go camping in autumn. The weather is still warm enough to enjoy the outdoors, but the crowds have thinned out since summer. Plus, you’ll get to see the leaves changing color in all of their autumnal glory.

In Norway, it is much better to go camping in summer. The days are long and there’s plenty of daylight to enjoy all that Norway has to offer.

Summer is the best time to go camping in Norway

Summer is the best time to go camping in Norway

No matter what time of year you choose to go camping in Europe, you’re sure to have an incredible experience. So, what are you waiting for? Start planning your trip today!

How to plan a camping trip in Europe

Make sure to pack everything you need – and then some!

No matter where you’re camping in Europe, it’s always a good idea to come prepared. This means packing all of the essentials like a tent, sleeping bag, food, and water, as well as some extra items just in case. A first-aid kit, flashlight, and multi-purpose tool are always a good idea, and don’t forget any medications you might need.

Choose your campsite carefully

When it comes to camping in Europe, not all campsites are created equal. Do your research in advance to find a spot that suits your needs, whether that’s close to hiking trails or near a lake for swimming. You’ll also want to make sure the campsite has all the amenities you need, such as toilets and showers.

Hire a campervan

If you’re planning on doing a lot of camping, it might be worth hiring a campervan. To do find a suitable campervan to rent out, it can be useful to consult online booking and price comparison sites such as www.campstar.com.

Hiring a campervan will allow you to have your own space and all the amenities you need while still being able to explore different parts of Europe. Just make sure you’re aware of the restrictions on where you can park.

Be respectful of nature

This one goes without saying, but it’s important to remember that you’re camping in nature and should treat it with respect. This means leaving no trace behind when you leave, picking up any litter you see, and being considerate of other campers

Don’t make these mistakes when camping in Europe

  1. Don’t forget to pack your passport! While most European countries are part of the Schengen Area and don’t require passports for travel, there are a few exceptions.
  2. Don’t forget to research the local laws and customs before you go camping. In some countries, like Germany, there are strict rules about where you can and can’t camp.
  3. Don’t forget your travel insurance! This is especially important if you’re going to be camping in a remote or wilderness area.
  4. Don’t leave your trash behind. Remember to take all your trash with you when you leave, and to leave no trace of your stay.

Camping in Europe: An experience you’ll never forget…

Camping in Europe is a great way to explore the continent and collect unforgettable memories. You will discover new cultures and meet new people while enjoying the great outdoors and nature. All in all, camping in Europe is an experience you’ll never forget!

 

Europe's Best-Kept Camping Secrets

Pin Europe’s Best-Kept Camping Secrets

If you are looking for a grand adventure, then a well-planned backpacking trip is the best way to find it because there is nothing quite like taking the long trail up a mountainside or through a gorgeous forest. However, while it may seem easy to just buy a backpack and start walking, there are many considerations and things you must do to prepare for a backpacking trip.

We are here to help. Whether you are an experienced hiker or you are just starting out, we have some great tips and pieces of advice that can be lifesavers during your next backpacking trip.

Choosing the Right Backpacking Gear

When starting to prepare for your a backpacking trip, then you will want to take some time to get your body and mind in tip-top shape so you don’t get out there to find out that you weren’t truly prepared.

For starters, you will need to choose the right backpack. If you are planning a long hike, then you will need to buy a pack that has all of the essential elements, including a top-loading design, extra pockets, and a water bladder pocket so you can always stay hydrated. Try on different packs and make sure that it is comfortable because you’ll have it on your back for long periods of time. 

As part of your training, you will want to find and purchase shoes or boots that are comfortable and durable enough to last throughout your adventure without falling apart or hurting your feet.

When shopping for boots, make sure to try them on before you buy. You’ll want to find boots that are snug around your entire foot but not too tight, and you should have a little bit of wiggle room for your toes.

You do not want them to be loose, or they could end up hurting your feet. Once you find what you need, wear them during your training.

Physically Preparing for Your Backpacking Trip

Next, you will need to get in shape and prepare your body for the long journey backpacking. You are going to want to practice by walking a lot in the months and/or weeks leading up to your hike.

You will want to aim for at least 10,000 steps a day. Once you get used to the motion, you’ll need to kick it up a notch by walking up and down hills or stairs so you can get your body used to that movement. As a final step, add weight to your backpack and walk with it a lot until you build up your muscles.

Basic First Aid for Your Backpacking Trip

It is important for both new backpackers and seasoned pros to brush up on the common risks and dangers that can occur out on the trail because if you are always prepared and you understand the potential dangers, then backpacking can be a very peaceful endeavor.

For starters, you never know when someone will trip or get hurt in some way, so it is essential to be protective and pack a first aid kit. Your kit should include basic hiking materials, such as gauze, bandages, sanitizer, and sunscreen, along with any necessary medications.

A common threat that can become a reality during a hike is the potential of ticks and other pests. It is important to know how to combat and prevent ticks, which includes wearing long pants, using insect repellant, always staying on the designated trail, and avoiding walking through long grass whenever possible.

Make it a point to stop at regular durations throughout your hike to check for ticks. Always look at the common hiding places, such as the back of the knees, between your legs, and around your waist. 

You will want to have a pair of tweezers in your first aid kit, and if you find a tick, use them to pull the head of the pest upward using even pressure. Once you are sure it is removed, clean the area with antiseptic.

Mapping Out Your Plan Ahead of Time

It is also a wise idea to research the trail ahead of time, so you don’t run the risk of getting lost or becoming stressed. If information is available, then get a general idea of the course that your trail will take and always follow all posted signage. Make sure that your phone is fully charged, and bring an extra charger so you can call for help if necessary.

Packing the Right Food to Optimize Nutrition

How you fuel your body before and during the adventure is an incredibly important part of preparing for your backpacking trip, so you have the physical strength to get through your journey. As you prepare for a backpacking trip, make an effort to change your diet and avoid the fast foods and overly sugary treats that can hinder your body and prevent you from enduring extensive periods of activity. 

Continue this diet up until the day of the hike. In the morning, make sure that you have a smart and solid breakfast. This is truly the most important meal of the day because by including fruit, dairy, and whole grains, you get the essential nutrients that your body needs, which helps to control your blood sugar levels, manage your weight, and most importantly, provide a natural energy boost to keep you going during the hike. You should bring other nutritious snacks like granola and trail mix so you can stay nourished and energized until the end.

Of course, you also need to drink plenty of water during your expedition. By staying hydrated, you replace the fluids that you flush out by sweating, and drinking water also helps you to stay alert. As a general rule, try to drink a half-liter of water for every hour of walking in moderate temperatures. 

As you can see, there is a lot to consider before you head up the trail during your next backpacking expedition. Follow the guidance provided here, and you will stay in great shape during your next adventure.

You’ve been reading about Australia for years: the exotic animals, majestic desert landscapes, and the stunning coastline. Now, it’s time for some adventure travel, though that may sound redundant because when backpacking Australia everything seems like an adventure. Your Australia bucket list must be full: There’s scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef, kayaking down the Katherine Gorge, and watching the sunset at Uluru. A shortage of destinations? Not at all. A shortage of cash? Possibly, as you’re looking at one of the most expensive countries in the world. However, you can still go backpacking in Australia on a budget and get the thrills you want by following these tips.

1. Use Apps to find Cheap Flights in Australia

Australia is a huge country, stretching 2,500 miles from east to west. This means that traveling by car from Brisbane to Perth will take days. To travel on a budget in Australia, save yourself time and money by flying on one of the country’s five main domestic airlines, and get the best price with an app like Skyscanner.

2. Ride the Australian Greyhound Bus

Ride the Greyhound Bus to backpack on a budget in Australia

Ride the Greyhound Bus to backpack on a budget in Australia

For shorter trips, the fabled bus line has got you covered with a “hop on, hop off” pass that allows you to do precisely that. To travel the 2,000 miles from Sydney to Cairns, for example, you’d pay just over $300USD, taking a break at any stop before jumping on board again.

3. Stay at Hostels while Backpacking Australia

Technically, this would save you money anywhere, but it’s particularly wise in Australia, where the average backpacker hostels are a fraction of the cost of a hotel. That’s roughly between $20USD and $30USD compared to, well, two or three times more. You’d sleep in a dorm, but the upside is you meet some interesting people while picking up travel tips to boot. Hostelworld has the largest inventory of hostels in Australia and millions of reviews from fellow travelers.

4. Use Couchsurfing throughout Australia

Australia has a large network of locals who will put you up for free after you set up a profile with the community here. It’s a great way to backpacking Australia on a budget, while meeting locals and learning about the country. Of course, if you’re worried about safety, you can check reviews by the host’s previous guests.

5. Bring the Right Gear

If you don’t have any camping gear, borrow some from a friend or find used items online. There are campsites across Australia, and some of them are even free of cost. Those, however, are often far from the major cities, so you’d probably need a vehicle to take advantage, says the experienced travel blogger behind Claire’s Footsteps.

The more versatile and comfortable your clothing is, the better. Fortunately, there are plenty of options that help to ensure you make the most of your travel wardrobe while keeping your budget, whether you’re looking for a pair of leggings, a hoodie, or relaxed-fit T-shirt.

6. Rent a Campervan to Explore Australia

Traveling Australia by campervan allows you to sleep in the back of your vehicle rather than pay the costs for a hostel or pitch a tent outside. It’s relatively easy to get through the open country, and you’ll save money by spending the night for free at rest stops when you can, says a writer with the Travel Hack. However, if you’re trying to travel on a budget in Australia, you’ll definitely want to plan your routes carefully and drive slowly, as those beasts can drink up all your cash in gasoline if you aren’t careful.

7. Get Smart About Your Meals and Drinks

Eating on a budget in Australia is possible at youth hostels, in the back of your campervan or with the gas stove that should be a part of your camping gear. One report says that Aldi is the cheapest place to get your groceries down under. Also, buy your booze from liquor stores rather than expensive bars, then share with the friends you meet at the hostel or the campsite. You should also buy a bottle of water once and refill it at water fountains (which are often called “bubblers”).


Now that you know how to go backpacking on a budget in Australia, you can focus on fun, but that won’t be too hard to find anyway. After all, fun is waiting around every corner in Australia. Enjoy your adventure!

As an entrepreneur and outdoor enthusiast, you’re probably wondering if working remotely is possible when you’re backpacking, camping, or otherwise engaged in outdoor activities. The answer: yes. However, it takes a bit of preparation. Here’s some advice:

Choose your adventures wisely when you have to work remotely

Let’s get this out of the way: it is not always possible to work remotely when you’re out camping. If you’re rock climbing, for example, you can’t stop and pick up the phone. The same goes for if you’re hiking a treacherous path. Make sure that you are fully acquainted with the area in which you plan to travel if you’re going to be outdoors and away from a regular office (or the business center of a hotel).

If you’re going to be working remotely while you’re traveling, choose activities that allow you to take a break of at least an hour at a time. This way, you have time to focus on both your work and the time you’ll spend with your family.

Know what equipment you need to work remotely while camping

You already know that you will need to invest in equipment that will keep you safe if you’re hiking or camping. This might include a camping backpack – which is especially important on multi-day trips – and a standalone GPS unit.

For working remotely while camping, you also need some basic office equipment. This might include a small tablet or laptop computer, a mobile hotspot, and a small folding table for writing. A special note here: make sure that you will have access to power while you are away. The Trekers blog notes that you may need a generator or portable battery.

Set yourself up for success if you run your own business

Believe it or not, it’s possible to run your own business while experiencing the great outdoors. Preparation goes beyond simply knowing your outdoor location and having the right equipment. You will also want to make sure that your work can continue without you should you be unavailable. Start by registering your business as an LLC. This makes it a standalone entity and gives you some financial protection. LLC regulations vary from state to state, so do your research first so that you know what you need before you get started.

You should also appoint an individual to act on your behalf when you can’t be reached. Even though your goal is running a business from the outdoors, you must be realistic: you won’t always be available. Create a company organizational chart so that your employees know who to get in touch with when you’re off the proverbial grid.

Software that enables working remotely while camping

You should also have digital tools and software that allow you to work remotely, whether you are camping or on the road. A few examples here are workflow/project management system and document sharing service.

There are several workflow management programs to choose from, including Asana and HubSpot. Most will integrate with Google Docs, which marketing agency PaperStreet asserts is a secure way to collaborate with your employees and team in real-time.

While there are many hobbies that won’t interfere with working remotely, those of us that spend more time outdoors than in understand that the things we love pose challenges if we want to run our business without being there. But, if you take the time to prepare ahead, you can circumvent many of the greatest hurdles and keep things moving no matter where you are in the world.

Whether you’re planning to hike in unpredictable weather or your upcoming backpacking trip is threatened by an encroaching storm, backpacking in the rain poses a challenge. Dealing with rain can make backpacking interesting and much more difficult, but if you plan properly it’s nothing to worry about.

Don't let a little rain get in the way of your backpacking trip!

Don’t let a little rain get in the way of your backpacking trip!

Many people find that backpacking in the rain makes the experience feel more peaceful, and it’s very fun if you make sure you’re ready for it. Without planning, you may end up drenched, miserable, and regretting your trip, so make sure to know how to deal with it!

If you use synthetic clothing and fleece, rainproof layers, waterproof footwear or gaiters, and a waterproof pack, you shouldn’t end up too wet or cold when it rains hard. It’s also good to pack some extra clothing to change into.

Picking a good campsite, setting up properly, and ventilating your tent are also vital. Blisters are also more likely, so giving extra effort to prevention and care is important.

There are more dangers like hypothermia, slick trails, and dehydration, but if you’re careful and pay attention to potential problems you won’t have issues. 

What to Wear Backpacking in the Rain

Layering is your best friend in a heavy downpour. Synthetics or a merino wool base layer are a good start to keep you warm and dry quickly. An insulating layer may be necessary depending on temperature, but obviously, this depends on the situation. A good rain jacket as your outer layer is ideal.

If you’re looking for a rain jacket for hiking, backpacking, and other outdoor sports I recommend looking into products that make gear for those activities. While there are plenty of great options on the market, a few brands to look into sited below:

These are not the only options, just examples that are good to start researching. Outdoor companies make products that will be more comfortable, ventilated, and suitable for higher levels of movement than other clothing brands.

Hardshell Jackets

Hardshell jackets are more suitable for higher amounts of rain, snow, and wind, and they’ll keep you protected in more hardcore weather.

Softshell Jacket

A softshell jacket will also often be waterproof, but will not offer the same protection as a hardshell jacket. Softshell jackets are generally more comfortable and breathable but offer less protection. 

Picking your ideal options comes down to the conditions of your backpacking trip, and how bad of weather you are expecting. There’s no need to break the bank, but especially if you’re going on a longer backpacking trip, making an at least mid-range investment will pay off.

Rain clothing with vents also makes wet, humid weather a bit more bearable. In especially rainy areas a pair of rain pants may be helpful as well. A waterproof, breathable pair of pants and gaiters go a long way when backpacking in the rain, especially in lower temperatures.

If it’s very warm, you may be better off shedding layers instead of adding them. On a hot day, if you’re comfortable with wearing a pair of shorts with a rain jacket or light shirt. If you’re comfortable with it and the weather is warm, hiking in the rain without a shirt feels great.

When Your Clothes Are Wet

When backpacking in the rain, if you’re soaked through your layers, do your best to evaluate your warmth. Generally, it’s alright to keep on your wet clothing, especially if you’re wearing multiple layers of synthetic or wool items. 

As the saying goes, there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothing!

As the saying goes, there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothing!

It may not be comfortable, but unlike cotton, it will dry over time. When you get into camp and you’re set up, change into dry clothing. If possible, hang up your wet clothes to dry.

If you do not have the opportunity to set up a clothesline or dry them in the sun, putting wet clothing under a sleeping pad if you have one can help them dry quicker. 

You should always have some dry clothing if hiking in bad weather, especially if the forecast is expected to stay bleak and rainy. In a pinch, staying in wet clothing can dry it off. It may be uncomfortable and take a while, but if you’re relatively warm and safe it won’t be a problem. 

Type of Backpack To Bring Backpacking in the Rain

Be sure to bring the right equipment if you'll be backpacking in the rain

Be sure to bring the right equipment if you’ll be backpacking in the rain

I recommend using dry bags (trash bags and baggies work as well) for clothing and sensitive items in your pack, and a waterproof backpacking cover if your backpack’s waterproofing isn’t reliable. Trashbags aren’t bad in a pinch, but a waterproof backpack is a better option by far.

The extra cost means your gear won’t end up drenched on the trail. Most outdoor companies offer waterproof backpacks made for hiking and backpacking. 

Check The Weather

Checking the weather is perhaps the most important piece of advice I can offer. It’s great to have all the best gear and know-how to use it, but if you don’t know what’s coming it won’t help you.

Knowing the weather can help you avoid poor conditions if you don’t want to deal with them, and be ready for them if you do.

It’s also good to know if you’re in for a storm or a shower, which can prevent potential issues down the line. Check the weather often, and be ready for the conditions coming your way. 

Picking a Campsite and Staying Dry

Especially when faced with rain, picking the right campsite is crucial

Especially when faced with rain, picking the right campsite is crucial

Picking the wrong campsite when backpacking in the rain can easily leave you in a puddle with your tent waterlogged. Look for a flat spot that’s not in a depression or low ground ideally with some tree coverage overhead. Never camp in a dry riverbed.

It’s also important to orient leeward of the wind, along with some sort of protection like boulders or trees. Make sure to avoid especially moist ground, and dead branches.

If you notice any dead branches above you, it’s a good idea to move your tent. A branch falling on you in the middle of the night is a less than ideal way to wake you from a deep sleep after a hard day of hiking in bad weather.

A tent footprint or a tarp is also ideal to prevent damage and leaks on the floor of your tent. If your tent has vents, put them to good use. Condensation buildup is no joke, and properly ventilating your tent when you have the chance will make your setup much more comfortable.

Otherwise, make sure your tent is waterproofed properly (You can manually waterproof it if an older tent is beginning to have trouble keeping water out), and utilize your rain fly or shield, or even a tarp rigged overtop of it. 

Practice Before Backpacking in the Rain

For the experienced and newbie alike, practicing the proper use of your equipment can be a huge time saver in a bad situation. If you’ve never pitched your tent but you need to in a storm, you’re most likely going to make mistakes, and at worst have to redo your setup at a less than opportune time.

Practice using any equipment you’re unfamiliar with, because you may not always have the time to learn on the fly. This rule is especially important for tents, as it can be the most essential item to put up in heavy rain, but you can easily end up drenched for the night if you do it wrong.

Terrain Dangers

Backpacking in the rain means taking extra precautions

Backpacking in the rain means taking extra precautions

I’m sure you’re already aware of the fact that you’ll face slick, puddled trails and that rocks, logs, and slopes will be hazardous, but you should be conscious of other potential problems ahead of you.

The most common danger you will encounter will be slick surfaces. Navigating difficult terrain can be hard already, but slippery rocks, hills, and so on can easily leave you injured.

Trekking poles can be very useful if you know you’ll end up on some especially slick terrain. The two added points of contact with the ground might save you if you need some extra balance.

If hiking in bad weather, sticking to forested areas can also assist in avoiding many of the problems faced when backpacking in the rain. The added coverage from trees often makes rainfall less intense to deal with. 

Larger rainstorms could make a river crossing much more dangerous. Surging river levels could make a generally easy crossing challenging. The same rules apply to most river crossings.

Be aware of what is downstream in case you’ve swept away, be wary of strainers to catch logs, brush, and debris in streams. Water flows through, a person can’t. If you have to cross, look for an area where the water is running slower, like undercuts or straight stretches to cross. Use extra caution if utilizing things like logs as a bridge, and have a contingency plan in case something goes wrong in a potentially dangerous crossing. 

Flash flooding, mud, and rock slides are all more common in rain as well. If you plan to hike in a canyon, make sure to frequently check the weather in case of flash floods, and be aware of how to quickly get to high ground if necessary.

Heavier rains also make mud and/or rock slides more likely, a danger that occasionally kills hikers. Be aware of your surroundings, listen for sounds indicating moving debris, and be alert to changes in weather. 

Know When to Bail

If you aren’t prepared for hardcore rain on your backpacking trip, if you’re miserable because of how drenched you are and how hard it’s getting, or if you’re unsafe due to heavier storms and lightning with little shelter, it’s ok to bail.

It’s not an especially fun option, and you may feel the need to press on, but the thing to remember is that it’s more important to be safe if you’re doubtful.

I’m not saying that you have to quit at the sight of a cloud that’s a little too gray or once you smell rain in the air, I’m saying that you will know when you should hang it up for the day. Like most things in hiking, the time you decide the weather is too much for your backpacking trip will vary from person to person.

If you’re a more casual hiker who wants a short, comfortable, and fun trip, you may not enjoy your experience beyond light to moderate rain. If you like a challenging trip, it’s perfectly acceptable to be outdoors in heavier rainfall or storms. It all comes down to what you want your experience to be, and if you’re prepared for the task at hand. 

Conclusion

While there are obstacles to backpacking in the rain, if you’re prepared it can be a great time. You’ll probably be one of the few people on the trail, and it can be extraordinarily peaceful. I personally love to be in the woods or on the trail in the rain.

If you properly prepare and make sure you’re aware of the potential dangers, you’ll have no problems. You’ll probably end up wet, and it may not always be a great time, but there’s no reason to fear a day backpacking in rain.