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Wouldn’t it be great if you could travel, meet new people, broaden your horizons, and generally have a grand adventure without blowing a hole in your wallet (or selling your kidney for that matter)? Believe it or not, you actually can (no kidneys involved). Some savvy backpackers have the formula figured out – they manage to globetrot on an amount of money you typically spend in your city for daily living.

While you don’t need to globetrot (not unless you want to), you could still have an awesome weekend trip on a shoestring budget, spending no more than you would anyway at home. It requires some planning, clever workarounds, and a few minor sacrifices. Read on for our best tips for how to plan a weekend trip on a budget.

Pick a flight first instead of a destination

The typical travel process is this: You pick a destination you want to visit and then, hopefully, find a cheap flight to get there. We recommend flipping the script: Pick a cheap flight first to a likely-looking destination. It could save you hundreds of dollars.

Furthermore, even if the destination isn’t your first choice, that doesn’t make it a bad one. There are plenty of undiscovered gems out there. You can and will still have a good time.

Be creative with your food

Besides flights, food and drinks will be amongst your biggest expenses when you’re figuring out how to plan a weekend trip on a budget, reports GOBankingRates. You could reduce your spending by being creative with your food. For example, pick a hotel or hostel with free breakfast, skip lunch, and then splurge on dinner. If you’re looking to penny-pinch, you could cook your own food or try cheap supermarket meals.

Hunt for last-minute deals or check out “secret” deals

Online travel portals will often feature last-minute discounts – say when a particular flight or destination isn’t fully booked. It pays to scour these deals. You will have to be flexible, but you could snag a top-tier destination at a rock-bottom rate. Secret deals are also worth trying out. They often include stays in well-known hotels and resorts. You find out the exact details after booking.

Have a Saturday-Monday weekend off-season

How to plan a weekend trip on a budget

Avoid peak weekend prices by traveling Saturday to Monday

When demand is high, so are prices. When you’re figuring out how to plan a weekend trip on a budget, consider traveling from Saturday to Monday (people typically book flights and stay Friday through Sunday). Traveling off-season also helps. “Shoulder season”, says Real Simple, is a good time to travel because it offers good pricing, fewer people, and better access to destinations. It refers to the period between low and high seasons for a particular destination.

Look for cheap or free stays

It goes without saying – prioritize cheap stays whenever possible. If you don’t mind sharing a room, you could have a perfectly comfortable bed in a hostel for $20 per night. If you’d prefer a bit more privacy, you could also find an affordable Airbnb, hotel room, or similar. You should scour top sites (like Booking.com) for deals.

Image via Unsplash

Prioritize hostels with free breakfast, classes, and activities

Plan a weekend trip that includes activities to stick to your budget

Book accommodation that includes activities to stick to your budget

Hostels are usually a good idea not just because of the cheap room, but also the board. Many throw in free breakfast and allow you to cook food in the kitchen. Furthermore, some offer special classes and activities to travelers. These range from yoga classes to walking tours, and everything in between. Not only could you have fun, but you’d also save money.

Minimize touristy activities

They call them tourist traps for a reason. Many tourist-related attractions charge premium prices. You will also end up paying more for eating or shopping in a place that’s near a major tourist landmark. If you truly want to experience a destination as well as save money, consider living like a local.

Make a budget and stick to it

This is just like our first tip: Usually, people pick a destination and then decide on a budget. It may be a good idea to reverse that process when determining how to plan a weekend trip on a budget – make a budget first. Think up how much you’d be okay with spending on entertainment, food, travel, shopping, and similar. Then stick to your resolution. Too many people end up overspending because they don’t hold themselves to a budget.

Share your travels and potentially earn money

If you’re the especially entrepreneurial type, you could also monetize your travel. You’ve likely heard of travel blogging, vlogging, and similar. You will need to document your travels, take plenty of photos, and share it all with your viewers. At the very least, you could have some memories for later (something to show your grandkids).

Good-quality snaps on social media can help you attract followers (and generally make good memories). You may need to use a photo size editor to adjust the size of your images to fit a social media platform’s requirements. It’s as simple as uploading a snap from your phone or camera, having it resized, and then download it for use on the social media page.

Image via Unsplash

Planning a weekend trip on a budget – final thoughts

As you can see, traveling doesn’t necessarily have to be expensive. Of course, when figuring out how to plan a weekend trip on a budget, you may have to forgo a few creature comforts, but you can still have a wonderful time. It’s a weekend well spent and will let you come back to work energized and refreshed. Don’t forget to follow these safety and general tips for the best results.

You’ve been reading about Australia for years: the exotic animals, majestic desert landscapes, and the stunning coastline. Now, it’s time for some adventure travel, though that may sound redundant because when backpacking Australia everything seems like an adventure. Your Australia bucket list must be full: There’s scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef, kayaking down the Katherine Gorge, and watching the sunset at Uluru. A shortage of destinations? Not at all. A shortage of cash? Possibly, as you’re looking at one of the most expensive countries in the world. However, you can still go backpacking in Australia on a budget and get the thrills you want by following these tips.

1. Use Apps to find Cheap Flights in Australia

Australia is a huge country, stretching 2,500 miles from east to west. This means that traveling by car from Brisbane to Perth will take days. To travel on a budget in Australia, save yourself time and money by flying on one of the country’s five main domestic airlines, and get the best price with an app like Skyscanner.

2. Ride the Australian Greyhound Bus

Ride the Greyhound Bus to backpack on a budget in Australia

Ride the Greyhound Bus to backpack on a budget in Australia

For shorter trips, the fabled bus line has got you covered with a “hop on, hop off” pass that allows you to do precisely that. To travel the 2,000 miles from Sydney to Cairns, for example, you’d pay just over $300USD, taking a break at any stop before jumping on board again.

3. Stay at Hostels while Backpacking Australia

Technically, this would save you money anywhere, but it’s particularly wise in Australia, where the average backpacker hostels are a fraction of the cost of a hotel. That’s roughly between $20USD and $30USD compared to, well, two or three times more. You’d sleep in a dorm, but the upside is you meet some interesting people while picking up travel tips to boot. Hostelworld has the largest inventory of hostels in Australia and millions of reviews from fellow travelers.

4. Use Couchsurfing throughout Australia

Australia has a large network of locals who will put you up for free after you set up a profile with the community here. It’s a great way to backpacking Australia on a budget, while meeting locals and learning about the country. Of course, if you’re worried about safety, you can check reviews by the host’s previous guests.

5. Bring the Right Gear

If you don’t have any camping gear, borrow some from a friend or find used items online. There are campsites across Australia, and some of them are even free of cost. Those, however, are often far from the major cities, so you’d probably need a vehicle to take advantage, says the experienced travel blogger behind Claire’s Footsteps.

The more versatile and comfortable your clothing is, the better. Fortunately, there are plenty of options that help to ensure you make the most of your travel wardrobe while keeping your budget, whether you’re looking for a pair of leggings, a hoodie, or relaxed-fit T-shirt.

6. Rent a Campervan to Explore Australia

Traveling Australia by campervan allows you to sleep in the back of your vehicle rather than pay the costs for a hostel or pitch a tent outside. It’s relatively easy to get through the open country, and you’ll save money by spending the night for free at rest stops when you can, says a writer with the Travel Hack. However, if you’re trying to travel on a budget in Australia, you’ll definitely want to plan your routes carefully and drive slowly, as those beasts can drink up all your cash in gasoline if you aren’t careful.

7. Get Smart About Your Meals and Drinks

Eating on a budget in Australia is possible at youth hostels, in the back of your campervan or with the gas stove that should be a part of your camping gear. One report says that Aldi is the cheapest place to get your groceries down under. Also, buy your booze from liquor stores rather than expensive bars, then share with the friends you meet at the hostel or the campsite. You should also buy a bottle of water once and refill it at water fountains (which are often called “bubblers”).


Now that you know how to go backpacking on a budget in Australia, you can focus on fun, but that won’t be too hard to find anyway. After all, fun is waiting around every corner in Australia. Enjoy your adventure!

If you are someone who loves to travel as much as I do, you’ll be familiar with the traditional advice on how to travel inexpensively. Hostels, couch surfing, camping… and eating nothing but buttered pasta for weeks on end. What if I told you that there is an easier way to travel the world, save money, and have a memorable once-in-a-lifetime experience? Imagine summiting Machu Picchu, getting a tan on the beaches of Lima, or dancing in Rio. Worldpackers makes finding volunteer work while backpacking South America more accessible than ever!

Volunteer in South America via a Reputable Agency

If volunteer work in South America sounds like something you want to do, it’s best to do it via a reputable agency. An agency will help screen volunteer programs and hosts in South America to make sure you have support every step of the way.

Finding a Host on Worldpackers

Worldpackers is a service that connects travellers with volunteer work in South America and around the world. Travellers and hosts use the service to find each other, and each provides an integral part of the exchange.

The hosts will offer a place to stay. Perhaps a hostel, camp, family home, farm, or NGO to a traveller in exchange for hours worked or volunteered on the property. A traveller works on the property a set number of hours per week in exchange for free accommodation, and sometimes other perks such as free food, free bike rentals, free tours… the list is endless!

How to build your Worldpackers profile

To begin on Worldpackers as a traveller, all you need to do is sign up, pay a yearly membership, USD $49.99 and begin searching for your dream volunteer program in South America. You can apply to as many experiences you like. If a host thinks that you’ll be a good fit, you’ll be pre-approved. All that’s left to do is book your flight and pack!

The Worldpackers interface is extremely intuitive and easy to use. You can search experiences by destination, purpose of the trip, availability, skills you offer, style of travel, hours of collaboration, trip length, additional benefits and more. That makes searching through their thousands of experiences easy and manageable. You can also read all reviews from other Worldpackers who have lived that experience, so you have the peace of mind that you’re making the right choice in applying. 

The site also offers hundreds of articles, videos and courses about how to stand out as a volunteer. You can earn badges and certificates for your profile which will make you a more desirable candidate and can increase your chances of being selected by the hosts you want! 

Long Term Volunteer Work in South America

Most Worldpackers volunteer trips in South America require the volunteers to stay between 2-4 weeks. However, you will find a huge variety of minimum time commitments on the site. 

The benefits of long-term travel are plenty. Connecting to a location, immersing yourself in a different culture, contributing to a local community and making lifelong connections are just a few of the highlights past Worldpackers shared in their reviews. 

There is also value in establishing a home base with a volunteer program when you are backpacking South America. When travelling and living out of a backpack for long periods of time, it can be a great reset to feel at home for a while. 

Your hosts and fellow travellers can become a family away from home and they can be a great resource for planning for your next destinations. 

Volunteer Trips In South America

Let’s look at some current volunteer opportunities for those backpacking South America. 

There are over 1500 volunteer positions available in South America at the time of writing this article. Some require as short of a time commitment of only one week! I’m happy to highlight just a few opportunities available this spring & summer.

Volunteer at the reception of a hostel in Bogotá, Colombia

This position is looking for a warm and friendly individual to work behind the counter greeting guests at their hostel. As a volunteer, you’d work 32 hours a week. You would also be asked to give a hand in the kitchen. 

Aside from a free bed, this experience also offers you free breakfast each morning, use of their kitchen, bikes at your disposal and discounts on drinks. This hostel has achieved top host status, meaning that they have consistently received great reviews from travellers who have lived this experience. 

Past Worldpackers have said this experience excels in helping them immerse themselves in the culture, meet locals, develop social awareness, and meet other international travellers. 

Explore more volunteer work in Colombia

Share your knowledge in Catuama, Brazil

Share your knowledge and experience on skills that you have developed or learned.

Do you have a special skill or talent? Why not bring yourself to Brazil to teach in a hostel! Whether it be teaching a sport, organizing events, or running a craft workshop – this experience may be for you!

This host is asking Worldpackers to stay at least 15 days. In exchange you get 3 days off per week, pickup, and transport to the hostel when you arrive, access to the kitchen and discounts on accommodation for your stay in other hostels as you continue with your travels.   

Other Worldpackers recommend this experience for getting in touch with nature, learning about sustainability and developing greater environmental awareness. 

Explore more volunteer work in Brazil

Volunteer at our Zoo in the Peruvian Andes Valley, Lima Peru

Join us as a Zoo volunteer! Work alongside skilled veterinarians and staff, at our local Zoo in the Peruvian Andes. As a volunteer, you will learn about each species and support by feeding animals, spending time/sharing loving energy with animals, helping veterinarians administer medications, cleaning, gardening, and maintaining the atmosphere for the animals.

If cost isn’t a limiting factor during your travel, there are even more opportunities available to you. This experience, and a select few others, may charge an additional fee. For instance, are you an animal lover? While backpacking South America, you could volunteer at a local zoo, helping to care for animals. 

This position only requires 3 hours of work each weekday, which frees up the rest of your time to explore this beautiful country! This position also provides breakfast and lunch each day. 

They accept couples as well as single volunteers, so if you are travelling with a partner or friend, they are welcome too. 

Those who have volunteered here say this experience was great for meeting locals, immersing in the local culture, and getting in touch with nature. 

Explore more volunteer work in Peru

Community Manager & Web Programmer in Cordoba, Argentina

If you’re looking for volunteer work in South America that would also look great on your resume, why not consider helping out as a community manager and web programmer during your backpacking trip?

 We are looking for a creative person who has knowledge in digital marketing, social networks and can also help us advertise the hostel organically and using digital ads.”

For anyone with tech skills to spare, this position could be not only fun, but also a great career opportunity to bolster your resume. 

This stunning hostel in Argentina is seeking a talented person to run their social media accounts, and the minimum time requirement is only one week.

You would work 32 hours a week which leaves plenty of time for exploring and spending time with your new friends from around the world.

Explore more volunteer work in Argentina

Multiply and cultivate ornamental plants in Chile

“We reproduce and research ornamental plants, especially the native ones… We’re 5 km away from the touristic city of Valdivia, close to national parks and other attractions. Come help us with different activities in our vivero.”

If you’ve got a green thumb and would love to be surrounded by nature while backpacking South America, why not volunteer in beautiful Chile on a working farm? You’d work farming, gardening, and helping with general labour around the property. 

This experience includes all meals, free laundry, and 2 days off a week. You can also use the on-site bicycles to get into town on your days off.

Explore more volunteer work in Chile


In conclusion, you don’t have to pay a ton of money to travel around the world or have unique experiences. Worldpackers is an incredible resource for backpackers, budget travellers, or those searching for enriching volunteer programs in South America. 

Their site’s search functions make it so easy to find the best volunteer work when backpacking South America. Regardless of your unique travel itinerary, I cannot recommend Worldpackers enough.

With 2022 full of hope, it’s time to dust off your backpack and think about where to go next. If you’re on a budget, you may be wondering about the cheapest backpacking destinations in the world. The thing is, especially if you’ve been aching to get back out there, ‘budget travel’ can be a bit of an oxymoron. People go traveling to see something new, and once it finally becomes possible to go backpacking in 2022, the last thing you want to do is restrict yourself.

The way to travel on a budget without feeling too limited is to go backpacking destinations where food, accommodation, and transport are cheap. This will allow you to stretch your budget and splurge on the occasional special activity to get the most out of your trip. The good news is, after you figure out a cheap way to get to your destination, it is possible to travel around some of the most beautiful destinations on earth for less than $20 a day. Believe it or not, it can sometimes be cheaper to be on the road than to stay at home considering your normal rent and daily expenses! 

So without further ado, here is our updated list of the cheapest backpacking destinations for 2022.

Bulgaria – The best Eastern European country for budget travel

Even though Bulgaria is the cheapest backpacking destination to visit in Eastern Europe, it has an abundance of gorgeous landscapes that rival its neighbors. During our 5 days in Bulgaria were able to see Alpine mountains, forested countryside, sandy beaches on the Black Sea, plus beautiful cities like Sofia and Veliko Tărnovo.

The Rila Monastery near Sofia in Bulgaria, one of the cheapest backpacking countries in the world

The Rila Monastery near Sofia, Bulgaria

Because we were traveling in the off season, we were able to splurge on the occasional high-end luxury accommodation for less than $100 a night. Of course, you can always find cheaper hostels in Bulgaria. Food and drink are also super affordable, with the average price of a beer being about a dollar.

Learn more: Backpacking in Bulgaria

India

India is one of those countries where budget travel is almost entirely dependent on your willingness to haggle. If you strike the right tone, India can be one of the cheapest backpacking destinations in the world.

When booking guesthouses, you’ll most certainly get a better price by booking directly with the guest house versus booking online through an agency. Transportation-wise, it is super cheap to get around in India. In the big cities, we recommend using Uber it’s actually much cheaper than the prices you’ll be quoted for a tuk-tuk ride. For intercity travel, trains cost between $8 – $30, and you can even find flights within that price range!

Learn more: Backpacking in India

Portugal – The cheapest backpacking destination in Western Europe

Portugal is a great option in Western Europe for travelers on a budget. You’ll be able to experience the vibrant European culture as well as world-famous food and wine at a fraction of the cost of what you’d pay in France or Spain. 

Learn more: Backpacking in Portugal

Cambodia

Cambodia has so much to offer, and you can travel there for about $20 a day. Private rooms in a nice guesthouse will cost you about $10, and tuk-tuk rides are a savvy way to get around. Our guest house helped us arrange a private tuk-tuk driver to help us visit the many temples of Angkor Wat for just $12!  You can even get a 30-day SIM card with 1.5 GB of data for $2.

Ta Prohm Temple in the Angkor Wat Temple Complex in Cambodia, one of the cheapest backpacking countries

Ta Prohm Temple in the Angkor Wat Temple Complex

Learn more: Backpacking in Cambodia

Georgia

With medieval fortresses, majestic mountains, and friendly locals, the country of Georgia should be much higher on the list of top backpacking destinations. And with delicious meals starting at $3, and $1 local buses, it’s one of the best countries for budget travel. You don’t have to withhold on the cultural activities here, since most entrance tickets cost around $2.

The Caucasus Mountains in Georgia

The Caucasus Mountains in Georgia

Learn more: Backpacking in Georgia

The Czech Republic

In the Czech Republic, the old trope ‘beer is cheaper than water’ is actually true. While the Czech Republic boasts much of the same beauty as its neighbors like Germany and Austria, it’s possible to travel here at a fraction of the cost.

Learn more: Backpacking in the Czech Republic

Bolivia – the cheapest backpacking destination in South America

Bolivia is one of the cheapest backpacking destinations in the world and is very popular with adventurers. Here, it is possible to get a 3-course meal for less than $2. Accommodation in a hostel dorm room costs between $8-$12 a night, and local and long-distance buses are a cheap way to get around. Even the most famous backpacker destination in Bolivia, the Uyuni Salt Flats, won’t break the bank, costing around $200 for 3 days, which is relatively cheap for this bucket-list destination!

Salar de Uyuni Salt Flats in Bolivia

Salar de Uyuni Salt Flats in Bolivia

Learn more: Backpacking in Bolivia

Nepal

Trekking in Nepal doesn’t have to cost as much as you might imagine. Other than the Everest Base Camp Trek (an exorbitant expense), there are plenty of beautiful Himalayan treks where it is possible to go by yourself. The Short Annapurna Circuit, for example, is well-marked with guesthouses along the path for about $5 a night, so you won’t have to carry tons of gear. (If you want to go all the way to Annapurna Base Camp, you’ll need to go with a guide). Food and drink in Nepal are also very affordable, with meals costing between $2-$3.

Learn more: Backpacking in Nepal

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is certainly one of those countries where you can travel on a budget or live in the lap of luxury for relatively affordable prices. Their infamous train system (a bucket-list item in itself) is the cheapest way to get around the country. Or, you could hire a private taxi to travel between cities with a few other people from your hostel. Keep a special travel budget set aside for entrance fees to nature reserves and UNESCO Heritage sites!

Learn more: Backpacking in Sri Lanka

Colombia

Colombia is one of our favorite backpacking destinations because of the friendly locals, diverse landscapes, and of course, affordability. You could easily backpack in Colombia for a month with just $1000 in your bank account. By taking long-distance buses, staying in hostel dorm rooms, and cooking your own food in the hostel kitchens, you can visit destinations like Medellín, Cartagena, and Salento on a budget.

The Cocora Valley near Salento, Colombia

The Cocora Valley near Salento, Colombia

Learn more: Backpacking in Colombia

Honorable Mention

Denmark

This country certainly doesn’t scream ‘budget travel’ but it’s the cheapest destination in Scandinavia. If visiting this part of the world has been a dream of yours, we can definitely recommend Denmark in comparison with its more expensive Scandinavian neighbors Norway, Sweden, or Finland.

Nyhavn Canal in Copenhagen, Denmark, one of the cheapest backpacking countries in Scandinavia

Nyhavn Canal in Copenhagen, Denmark

Learn more: Backpacking in Denmark

 

Backpacking means that you can get out and explore the world however you see fit. Though you might want to always be on the move, there are times when it is better to sit still and work a little. One of the best work travel jobs for backpackers is working a season at a ski resort in Europe or North America. Here are some of the reasons why this might be the right choice for you!

A Variety of Work-Travel Opportunities

One of the best reasons to work a season at a ski resort can simply be for the variety of work available. After all, a ski resort might as well be a small city, so there should be plenty of roles that you could fulfil.

If you have the qualifications and the experience, you might be able to find a role as a ski or snowboard instructor. You could also get a job maintaining the slopes and helping out with other aspects of managing the pistes.

Of course, there are also plenty of roles in hospitality. You could work in the lodges, whether they are for private owners or just for people renting for a week or two.

There is usually also a good amount of bar work in the ski resorts. Get your applications in early so you have a good chance at landing a role that works for you and your skills!

Enjoy the Ski Resort Benefits

Use your days off to enjoy employee discounts at the ski resort

Use your days off to enjoy employee discounts at the ski resort

A great reason to choose to work a ski season will always be the days off. Many jobs at resorts will come with either a staff pass or a serious discount for a day pass to the slopes. If you are not scheduled in, you will be able to head out and enjoy everything that the resort has to offer!

Just make sure that you are fully prepared for your time outside so that you can keep yourself safe on the slopes. It would be devastating if you were to run into trouble at the start of the season and would be left having to give up your position. Use tools like pistepro.com to monitor conditions on the slopes, and make sure your equipment is always properly maintained.

Meeting People from All over the World

Meet people from all over the world while working at a ski resort

Meet people from all over the world while working at a ski resort

When you choose to work a season at a ski resort, you will be able to meet people from all around the world. Whether you are a housekeeper or a bartender, there is always a chance that you will run into someone from the other side of the world who might nevertheless be your new best friend.

You have to work, and work hard, but don’t forget to have fun too! A ski resort is a great place to live for a few months.

Whether you are in Canada, one of Europe’s best ski resorts, or anywhere else with amazing slopes, you will have so many opportunities at your feet. Don’t be afraid to take on new challenges and embrace everything this adventure has to offer you!

As a backpacker, it can sometimes be good to stay put for a little while. In addition to the experience of working in a ski resort, you will be able to work up a fantastic pot that you can use to further your travels.

Working at a Ski Resort Abroad

If you’re interested in traveling abroad to work at a ski resort, be sure to check into the local visa rules for work travel. Some countries grant short-term work visas for people who are only interested in working for a season.

Working at a Ski Resort in the USA

Most of the ski resorts in the US are found in the West and Central regions, in the Sierra Nevadas and the Rocky Mountains. There are also some top-notch ski resorts found in the Northern New England area, in Vermont and New York State.

If you are a US citizen, you shouldn’t have any complications finding short term work at a ski resort in the US. Lots of young people choose to work a season at a ski resort in between high school and university, or after graduating from college.

If you are not from the US, you’ll need to secure a work visa to work a season at a ski resort. The most common work travel visa for the USA is the H2B visa. With this visa, the ski resort sponsors you directly to work there.

Unfortunately, in the past couple of years, the number of H2B visas has been limited, since ski resorts need to show that they cannot find a US citizen to fill the job. If you are a certified ski or snowboard instructor, you’ll have a better chance of landing a job at a US Ski Resort. Be sure to apply ahead of time, since most of the jobs are filled in the springtime before the winter season.

Working at a Ski Resort in Canada

Famous for backcountry skiing and massive Rocky Mountain resorts, Canada is one of the best places to work a season at a ski resort. Besides, Canada has a working holiday visa program, which makes it easier for foreigners to get a ski resort job in Canada compared with the US and even Europe.

The working holiday visa is open for most countries for young people from age 18 to 30/35. The benefit of the program is that you do not have to secure a job before going. The visa is valid for a year or two (depending on your country) and allows you to travel to Canada and start looking for a job.

Be sure to check the specific requirements to see if you’re eligible for a work travel visa for Canada.

Working at a Ski Resort in Europe

The most popular European ski resorts are found in Austria, Switzerland, France, and Germany. You can also go north to Scandinavia and find work in Norway or Sweden.

If you are a local EU citizen, you won’t have any visa trouble securing a job at a ski resort in Europe. However, if your job will have any sort of client interaction, you must speak the local language of the resort. Unfortunately, it can be very difficult for non-EU citizens to secure a job at a European ski resort since most of the jobs will go to the locals.

However, Austria and France now have a work-travel agreement with several countries, including Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Israel, Chile, Japan, New Zealand, Korea and Chinese Taipei.

Switzerland does not have a work-travel visa program, so your only option would be to hope for a cash job at a Swiss Ski Resort.

Nevertheless, if it is your dream to work a season at a ski resort in Europe, be sure to check the working requirements, as things may change in the future.


Where will you go next? What will you do? All could be determined by what you manage to save up whilst working at the ski resort.

Take the time to work out whether this could be the right move for you careerwise, and then see if there is a ski resort that will take you on for the season!